Sunday’s Best Pt. XXX

Mancunian Synkro has been dipping his toe into a variety of musical waters over the past couple of years. The “Look At Yourself” EP, released to relaunch Indigo’s Mindset label after a two-year break, saw the producer pair sexy Rhodes with r’n’b samples for a balmy but skittish sound. Now Mindset are revisiting that EP for a remix package, and our curiosity has been piqued by DjRum’s take on the lead track. The original is the fiery slow burn of the night’s last shot warming your stomach, but Rum’s mix is a cooler and more expansive,  the soundtrack for the reluctant walk home against a doleful dawn. The Whitney samples are still there, but the bass drops lower while the tempo goes higher. This is an eleven minute epic which starts with a moody drone and a Silence of the Lambs sample, all unearthly choral vocals and fidgety breaks. But it begins to soar around its midpoint, as a beautifully placed string arrangement carries the composition to gorgeously new heights. Ending with a sax solo, it circles down into soulful, sorrowful denouement. The overall effect results in the kind of wonderfully cinematic sound that DjRum champions, and it’s really wonderful.

Stream: Synkro – Look At Yourself (Djrum Remix) | Szare – Leaning Towers Of Concrete (ASC Remix) (Mindset Records)

New York-based Stones Throw artist Homeboy Sandman has just put out “All That I Hold Dear”, his second in a series of single-producer records. Having previously worked with El RTNC on “Kool Herc: Fertile Crescent”, this time he’s teamed up with Texan producer and radio host M Slago. Slago’s straightforward soul samples over jerky, gated beats make a perfect fit for Boy Sand’s languid yet intelligent rhymes. “Musician”, a free cut offered by Stones Throw, clarifies his position not as a rapper, but as the eponymous musician. The number of quotables on offer would warrant a post on their own, but the most relevant line for this quarter concerns the aftermath of Mr Lamar’s most famous recent work: “I’m not concerned with being the best or being better than you, I’m concerned with being better than me.” While already an artist on the fringes, albeit established at a wonderful, thriving label, this sets Sand aside as a man in constant battle with himself, unswayed by petty beefs or popular opinion. His evolution and constant quest for self-improvement make for glorious listening, so bask in its reflected glory all day long.

Stream: Homeboy Sandman – Musician (Stones Throw)

Eliphino is a man that needs no introduction here on Truants; his ‘More Than Me’ EP on Somethinksounds in 2011 was so highly revered, picking up praise from Giles Peterson and various Radio 1 DJ’s, that the low slung dancefloor bangers could be heard punching out from sound systems all across the UK. But we’re going to avoid giving y’all a Tom Wrankmore history lesson and link you up with his latest remix of Kodiak’s ‘Dragon Drop’. Kodiak – aka Mark John Rutherford and Jamie Kingett made their debut release on Numbers last year with ‘Spreo Superbus’ and have now teamed up with Unknown to the Unknown for their ‘Dragon Drop’ EP. Contrasting to the EP’s title track, Eliphino’s remix sides towards a sturdy house feel, yet again producing a track that is a sure fire to get any club going. You can head over to XLR8R where they have very kindly provided us with a free download; pretty chill of them.

Stream: Kodiak – Dragon Drop (Eliphino Remix) (Hot Haus)

We’ve long been fans of Jerry JonesGold River Show – in fact it has this GMT-bound Truant staying up until 5am every Friday morning just to catch it live on East Village Radio. Jones has been kinging it at the helm of the NYC pre-club radio slot for little over a year (recent guests have included Kingdom, DJ Slow, J-Cush, Spencer and TT alumnus Meaghan Garvey), but he recently decided to expand his empire by curating “The Grand Opening Compilation”, a nine-track freebie that, much like his radio shows, has only the dancefloor in mind. Wreck Tech‘s sample of Bell Biv DeVoe’s “Poison” forms the backbone of his contribution’s footwork pulse, practically doubling the BPM of the original and trading its new jack swing for something headier. Strict Face, who provided our inaugural Functions of the Now mix back in August, bookends the compilation with his own “Sweet Dreams” and a “Shawty Wassup” remix; his take on Dallas rap duo Yung Nation‘s anthemic “Shawty Wassup” gives it a bounce that’s ripe for the club. His other offering, “Dreams”, starts the compilation off on a sinister tip, a vibe which is upheld by On Ice on his edit of DJ Dior‘s “Elevator”. The edit is best described by Jones himself: ‘shit sounds straight evil’. “Elevator” and DL DJ‘s “Acting” follow a ballroom formula, the latter instructing ‘bring it to the runway’. Although the majority of the compilation is instrumental, one of the highlights is “Hustle”, from San Antonio-based MC Paul Fisher. Originally featured on Fisher’s “Stop” mixtape (which Jones hosted),  “Hustle” sees Fisher snarling over one of J. Frank’s woozy beats. Fisher has been on his grind for a while, but in the wake of Southern Hospitality’s (excellent) mix of Texas club music, it feels like his brand of strip club rap might finally get the shine it deserves. There’s additional tracks from Kreuger, Copout and Cabo Blanco (who remixes Zebra Katz‘ “Sex Sellz” into a blissed-out house number), so do yourself a favour and grab it.


Stream: Yung Nation – Shawty Wassup (Strict Face remix) 

Words by: Tabitha Thorlu-Bangura, Aidan Hanratty, Jess Melia and Sophie Kindreich. 

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